The Sporkful | Podcast Review | November 30, 2015 | By

The Sporkful: What Rocker Sammy Hagar and Chef Jacques Pepin Have In Common

Dan reiterates Jacques’s most salient point, the kitchen table is the great equalizer. It’s where celebrities, grandmothers, grandsons, Sicilians, chefs and novices can all enjoy good food and good company.



If you’re assuming that based on the title and description of this week’s episode Sammy Hagar and Jacques both like to cook and eat, you would be correct! Sammy and Jacques have stronger parallels than one would imagine.

Apparently, Sammy Hagar has Sicilian grandparents and his own cookbook, not to mention a line of Cabo Wabo tequila and cantina restaurants. His grandparents would argue all the time. When drunk, grandma would run away (usually to Sammy’s house). From what I gathered, Sammy was telling the more tame stories about Grandma. I’m convinced that either rock stars are all either excellent story tellers, or they have just lived much crazier lives for their entire lives. It’s often a combination of both, with their storytelling skills honed from years of being on the road.

In that vein, Sammy’s grandpa may or may not have run a speakeasy-style deli out of a trailer. I won’t spoil any more, but aside from ramping up the intensity to 11, rock stars and their families really aren’t any different than your regular family.

From Sammy’s stories, I’ve gathered that deep down everyone wants to be a cook. He mentions one of his proudest moments being when he made pizza for his younger brother, which Sammy was complimented on. Again, sometimes you do forget these celebrities are just regular people that have similar hobbies and interests as the rest of us. Hagar is no exception.

Rock stars, again, being just like us non-rock stars, text each other pictures of paella—in the same way that I text my mom to prove that I can cook more than just grilled cheese. There are few moments that can create more pride than creating something that someone can enjoy. That’s what art is. And that’s not excluded from what we do in the kitchen.

Jacques Pepin, who should need no introduction, is no stranger to making art in the kitchen. On top of that, he seems like he knows how to live.

Just for this past spring, Jacques, bought 70 cases of wine. And again, though he’s a celebrity, Jacques likes to buy wine on the cheap—which only fuels my conspiracy that there is no such thing as expensive tasting wine. As expected, Jacques and Sammy aren’t so different. Both do enjoy cooking, but I think Jacques may be the more experienced partier. Never underestimate the French.

Jacques cooks to please people, but he sounds like he does so without the goal of impressing fellow chefs. He just wants to make his guests happy. The theme of cooking across generations extends to Jacques, as he often cooks with his granddaughter. He eloquently states that there’s no other place like the kitchen for a child. And I agree. For development, I can’t think of a more useful and beneficial exercise than learning how to cook amongst family.

Jacques Pepin’s interview was a little on the short side, but I’ll take what we can get. It was worth it just for the tiny sound bites of wisdom that I will probably claim as my own around my own dinner table discussions. 1

Dan reiterates Jacques’s most salient point, the kitchen table is the great equalizer. It’s where celebrities, grandmothers, grandsons, Sicilians, chefs and novices can all enjoy good food and good company.

Next week, I will finally unleash my write-up on the live episode on the debate: Is a hot dog a sandwich?!


  1. Where I’m pretending to be my own version of Jacques Pepin. ^

About the Author

Nick Wade is a founding writer at Audiologue, where he writes about The Sporkful and Stuff  You Should Know. You can find him at nick@audiologue.xyz.

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